Bottle Trees

Got a need for some modern art to spruce up a stage or a boring corner of your foyer? Steve Mullins from Barefoot Church came up with this inexpensive stage accent to spice up your real estate. Using 10′ lengths of 3/8″ and 1/2″ rebar from Lowe’s, he got his friend to weld various lengths together to form the branches of the trees. Continue Reading…

Light Boxes

Earlier in 2009 we did a series on worship called “That Thing You Do”. Our series graphics looked a lot like the poster for the movie, and I wanted to mirror that look on the stage. However, it was a short series, and I didn’t want to spend a lot of money on stage props. So I found a cheap way to make light boxes that would also be cool during the music. Continue Reading…

Paper Lanterns

One of my favorite new stage design elements is paper lanterns. They are so inexpensive yet so cool…plus you can get them in pretty large sizes which work well for stages. We’ve started using them at the Summit Church to light the room, but here are some examples of paper lanterns used for stage designs:

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Truss Your Heart

I love trusses…they’re just so expensive. When we bought our circular truss that we hang in the middle of our building…holding our projector and stage lights…we found the cheapest place to get it. We spent $1600 for a 13 foot diameter triangular circle truss. Pretty amazing, huh? Where did we get this amazing deal? I’m so glad you asked. Continue Reading…

Yo, Mondrian!

Mondrian was a Dutch painter in the early 1900s who used a certain concept in his paintings. Crossroads Community Church in Atlanta used this concept for part of their stage design. To create the Mondrian-themed pieces, they used 1″x2″ board bought from Home Depot or Lowes. They cut them into the right sizes, assembled the frames, and spray painted the frames glossy black.

Shoji…Oh, Gee!

Sometimes you want a really cool backdrop but don’t have a lot of stage depth to play with. Japanese shoji screens are a great way to add some life and texture to a stage without taking up a lot of space. You can buy them around $50 if you know where to look (like Hobby Lobby or Target), or you can spend a bit more depending on what types of shoji screens you’re looking for. They come in colors, patterns, or in plain white (my favorite). The thin translucent paper is perfect for both front or backlighting. Continue Reading…