Stacks-on-a-Deck-Stage-Design

Stacks on a Deck

Billy Hardy from Lafayette Community Church in Lafayette, IN brings us these stacks of light boxes and pallet deck for their back wall.

They have a very small stage area and low ceilings. This makes some designs difficult. But they decided to go ahead and try to to incorporate some design elements to try and enhance the worship experience.

When they built the wall, they laid boards over each other in a seemingly random pattern to create the 3 dimensional feel to the project. After the pallet wall, they decided to go for the light boxes. These boxes were very inexpensive and easy to customize. They did not have the ability to purchase more LED lighting, so they had to create another option. They built lights with extension cords and ceiling light fixtures.

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8 responses to Stacks on a Deck

  1. What specific type of lights are those inside of the Shatterboxes?

  2. Here is how I made them:

    I purchased a light fixture base.
    http://www.menards.com/main/lighting-ceiling-fans/lighting-hardware-accessories/shade-holders-bases/steel-shade-holder/p-2050148.htm.

    I also purchased metal electrical rough in boxes for new construction.
    http://www.menards.com/main/electrical/rough-electrical/junction-boxes/new-work/4-square-box-for-conduit-case-only/p-1408652-c-6429.htm

    I then purchased cheap house hold electrical extension cords.
    http://www.menards.com/main/electrical/electrical-cords-outlet-adapters/extension-cords/16-2-9-brown-indoor-cord/p-2193753-c-6410.htm.
    I cut off the receiving ends of these cords and wired then into the light fixture base. I attached the base to the electrical box, and this created the stand for the light. I actually used 15′ cords, so that I had more flexibility with the location of the boxes. for the actual light I purchased these bulbs in 3 different colors. I choose the CFL to reduce the heat that would be put out by the bulb itself.
    http://www.menards.com/main/lighting-ceiling-fans/light-bulbs/fluorescent/mood-lites13-watt-60w-spiral-canelabra-base-green-2700k-cfl-bulb/p-1968631-c-7478.htm

    You can see through the pictures that this was actually a fairly easy project to build the light boxes. The boxes took about 6 hours to build along with the assembly of the lights. and total cost around $60. This has had an amazing impact on the room dynamic. People want us to leave them up after Christmas, but we have different plans for future.

  3. How did you build those boxes?

    • We used 20×20 furnace filters and black duct tape and black electrical tape and simply taped them together. They are butted up together in the corners and then taped. Each box is independent of each other and then I can rearrange how many are on each stack or how they are sitting on the stack, so that they do not always have to be tilted.

  4. That is exactly what we used, however the price is pretty high. Try this place

    http://www.fleetfarm.com/detail/aaf-stratadensity-fiberglass-furnace-filters/0000000046493

    We only paid $.57 each for them.

  5. steve massingill April 21, 2014 at 3:39 pm

    great design…… please sent this to my email address thanks steve

  6. How did you construct the pallet wall. What did you nail the boards to? Also how did you mount it to the wall itself?

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