3d-Coroplast

3D Coroplast

Aaron Campbell from Rockford First in Rockford, IL brings us this great use of tons of Coroplast.

This series design was for their home group series: Love + Works. So they created this set with roughly 50 sheets of 4×8 Coroplast. The hanging ‘+’ symbols were attached to each other using about 10 bottles of Loctite Super Glue and a handful of white zip-ties. These were attached to their upper trussing and projection screens using black tie-line (rope). They hung everything using a rolling scissor lift.

The letters were all white Coroplast, over 2×4 wooden frameworks. The curves were created by slitting the outer side of the Coroplast every inch or so using a coro-claw. The letters were measured and created by one of their media interns who worked almost exclusively on these for 4 days. These used between 15 and 20 sheets of Coroplast.

The light boxes were black Coroplast with clear or Natural Coroplast backing. They hand-cut the holes after a failed attempt with a router and jig.

They rented blinders to put inside the four structures to light them.

After the designed this, they built it in about 5 days with 5 people, with another 5 jumping in here and there.

The primary cost was the Coroplast, though they had rental fees on the lift and lighting. The set cost roughly $1500.

24 responses to 3D Coroplast

  1. God is amazing!!!! I have been struggeling with a design project that requires large letters like this and I was at a loss for how to create them! Thank you for sharing your wonderful talents! I just love how God uses us to build his kingdom!!!!!

  2. Jenifer De Figueiredo October 25, 2012 at 1:49 pm

    One word: AWESOME! :)

  3. What did you use to make the supports?

    • The letter framework was all 2×3 or 2×4 framing lumber. We built a large box to frame out the “Works” for the “Love +” to sit on out of 2×4 with a plywood top. Hope that helps, Sandy.

  4. Image Information:
    The 8th picture down from the top (or 5th up from the bottom) is our preliminary mock-up created in Photoshop. We used this to pitch the initial idea, estimate materials, and refer to through out the build.

  5. Camby! Great job dude! Looks awesome!!

  6. Who have you found to be a good supplier of Coroplast?

  7. We have a place in town (Rockford, IL) called Rockford Central Plastics. We get white for $12 per 48″x96″ and all other colors for $13. I’ve heard there’s a place that’s closer to Chicago that’s does this:

    Cope Plastics (Bolingbrook, IL):
    $10- any color when we order under 115 (48″ x 96″)
    $8.89- any color when ordering 115 or more (48″ x 96″)
    It’s a different brand, but is the same stuff.

    Hope that gives you a frame of reference, Will.

    • Does anyone know of any places in or around Bakersfield, Ca who sells this material? Everyone here wants $40 to $50 a sheet for Coroplast and I cant figure out why! Someone please help! We are a very small church and on a very very low budget so any insite or suggestions are very much apreciated! Thanks – “DJ”

  8. This is where we got it for $10 a sheet. Although I think you have to buy in bulk to get tha price.
    http://www.sabicpolymershapes.com/polyshapes/en/Home/Home/home.html

  9. Aaron

    This is TIGHT! We want to make those boxes (specifically the two larger ones in the middle). How did you do the lighting on the inside. From the picture the light looks really bright and evenly distributed.

    Any tips on how to make the boxes would be great too!

    • Hey Josh,
      We used an eight light audience blinder panel laying on the floor in our box. The outer box was black coroplast (on a wooden 2×4 frame) with holes cut out. We over-layed the holes on the inside with opaque coroplast, and that evened out the light coming from the bottom. Granted, the lights we used were incredibly bright. The boxes were about 4×4 square, so there was enough room where heat wasn’t a problem.

      • Nice!

        Thanks for the timely response!

        I hate asking a million questions, but figured would ask rather than trying and messing up! hahah

        So the base was 2×4 with small holes drilled / cut in. On top of that was a 4×4 box with a large circle, and on top of that was another 4×4 box with the 3 rows of 3 circles on top.

        And 1 audience blinder covered all three layers correct?

        We have a bunch of regular par cans, you think they would do the trick if we put a few in each box or would they generate too much heat?

  10. I just made some pillars out of the coreblast. We used our can lights (LED). If you don’t have that you could use Christman LED lights. Wrap the lights around a floating pole or structure and place floating inside your cube/ set. I found that you can’t have the set very much larger than what your lights are. So if you use Christmas lights-and they MUST be LED as standard lights heat up too much and could be a fire hazard- you may have to use multiple sets of lights. Hope this helps.

  11. Do you have a black coroplast panel on the back of the “works” box? How do you create the “R”…it must be attached to something.

  12. Are all the letters just superglued together? Did you create framing for the interior parts of the “R” or the non-linear letters like the “V” and the “O”…or are they just glued together?

  13. Thanks for the inspiration!

    Picture of our set here.
    http://www.freeimagehosting.net/n8uce
    http://www.freeimagehosting.net/qowu5 (no lights)
    We have 2 campuses.

  14. I know that it has been a while since this post was uploaded, but it is a very cool design. I was wondering the thickness of the coroplast and what you used to cut it.

    Thanks!

  15. We are using clear coroplast to make a “buffering” design for a backdrop. How do we suspend out from wall or from ceiling so we can back light it when there are several pieces that form the circle?

  16. Anyway I can get a full pic of the back side? Trying to figure out how to frame se letters.
    Thanks!

  17. We now have three light boxes which are approx. 84″ x 30″ x 24.” We use two high intensity fluorescent lights mounted inside on the back wall of each box to light a white coroplast sheet in front. Imagery is are cut from black posterboard and mounted on the coroplast to create silhouetted designs. Plywood veneer covers the top, sides, and back of each box. The frame work of the boxes is made from 2″ and 1″ wood.

    These boxes are a set which is moved on and off of our chancel between services. The boxes are quite heavy and this has become a problem. Any suggestions for remaking these boxes in other, lighter material? Would the boxes hold up if made from just 1″ wood? We appreciate any suggestion you can make.

    Myron Hansen
    Pasadena Community United Methodist Church

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